For many women and their partners, having a baby at a roughly planned time is critical.

While most (85%) of couples will succeed in getting pregnant over a year of unprotected intercourse, sometimes it is helpful to plan or predict how and when to get pregnant. Much of this planning has to do with knowing how female reproductive physiology works and how to use this to get (or avoid getting) pregnant.

A large number of fertility medical apps exist to help a woman (even Obstetrician-Gynecologists (Ob/Gyn) themselves) determine how to maximize their ability to get pregnant.

This is a review of key fertility apps from my perspective as an Ob/Gyn Resident Physician. Almost all fertility apps will need some information from you – the first date of your last period (LMP) and the cycle length (the number of days from the first day of a period to the next first day).

Some applications are more complicated, relying on appropriate knowledge of your cycle and your body – features used in fertility awareness methods (FAM).

Since there has been an explosion of fertility apps recently with a diverse set of features, we selected 20 fertility apps and then divided them into subcategories:

“Simpler Apps”
“Calendar Centric Apps”
“Calendar + Numbers + Icons”
“More Complex Apps”
“Social Media Driven Apps”
“Multiple Parameter Apps”
“Alternative Medicine Apps”

We rank the apps in each of the above categories and in our conclusion we discuss which apps we recommend out of these subcategories.

The “Simpler” Apps

The following apps are very straightforward and not too complex.

These apps provide fertility information and guidance in a very similar fashion. Where they differ is noted by each respective app. Each app uses personal information required to identify your next period, your next ovulation, and inform you when you might be fertile. The usual information includes the first date of the last menstrual period (LMP) and period cycle length. These apps are simple but straightforward and easy to use.

The app’s home page tells you if you could get pregnant today, when the possible birthday of a child conceived this day is, when your next period is, and when your next ovulation would be. The calendar month formats are often (but not always) color coded and icons indicate when you ovulate and depending on the day of conception, whether your child is likely to be a boy or girl (this is based on controversial theories (Settles, Whelan) and inconsistent research results).

While we know there are differences in the motility and survivability of X chromosome-carrying sperm versus Y chromosome-carrying sperm, I do not put much faith in the ability to time getting a boy or a girl. The evidence is not great and there is limited (and no recent) evidence.  We don’t endorse the gender determining sections of these apps.

#5 Baby Maker Fertility

The Baby Maker Fertility provides similar information as the others in this section. It differs by its background, which changes according to how likely fertilization (based on the day of your cycle) would occur (stork included).

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What It Has

  • Graphics

What it Doesn’t Have

  • Fertility tips
  • Calendar
  • Cycle tracking
  • Prediction Kits
  • Biometric use
  • Tracking/charting features
  • Social/group chats
  • Statistics
  • Evidence

Price

  • available on the iPad and iPhone for free; the Pro version is $0.99
  • at time of publish, not available for the Android

#4 Baby Predict (Baby Maker Predictor Calculator)

  • The Baby Predict app has similar features to Baby Maker Fertility, but no stork included, just appropriately color-coded babies.

What It Has

  • Graphics

What it Doesn’t Have

  • Fertility tips
  • Calendar
  • Cycle tracking
  • Prediction Kits
  • Biometric use
  • Tracking/charting features
  • Social/group chats
  • Statistics
  • Evidence
  • Available on the iPhone and iPad for $0.99
  • At time of publish, not available for the Android

#3 Maybe Baby 2013

The Maybe Baby app’s main page shows a stoplight– depending on if you desire pregnancy or not, you can change the stoplight color. If you desire pregnancy, set the app to give you a green smiley face. When you open up the app, the color of the stoplight (red for pregnancy likely not possible, green for pregnancy likely possible) tells you right away if you are fertile.

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What It Has

  • Graphics

What it Doesn’t Have

  • Fertility tips
  • Calendar
  • Cycle tracking
  • Prediction Kits
  • Biometric use
  • Tracking/charting features
  • Social/group chats
  • Statistics
  • Evidence

Price

  • available on the iPad and iPhone for $4.99
  • at time of publish, not available for the Android

#2 Get Pregnant

The Get Pregnant Fertility Ovulation Test app is an almost mirror image of the Maybe Baby app, but adds an additional feature of an ovulation test. The ovulation test used by this app is that of cervical mucus. Once you have put in the cervical mucus length (you can even measure this in iPhone widths), the app interprets the length and tells you if ovulation has occurred.

Cervical mucus length and consistency are a sound method to help determine fertile points in the cycle. The iPhone width (each width on a 4s is 5.86cm) calculation does not correlate perfectly with centimeter measurement for when the cervical length signifies fertility (5.274cm vs. 6cm).

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What It Has

  • Graphics
  • Prediction Kits
  • Biometric (limited)

What it Doesn’t Have

  • Fertility tips
  • Calendar
  • Cycle tracking
  • Tracking/charting features
  • Social/group chats
  • Statistics
  • Evidence

Price

  • available on the iPad and iPhone for $1.24
  • at time of publish, not available for the Android