Continuing our exploration into the research due to be presented at Medicine 2.0, we now present the next three semi-finalists for the iMedicalApps mHealth Research Award.

You can read about the other contenders for the award here, here and here.

 

 

 

 

What are they really doing on that smartphone? How medical students, residents and faculty use their mobile devices

Summary of Abstract:

This abstract presents a cross-sectional survey of undergraduate and graduate students, residents, faculty members and clinical instructors across four faculties of medicine in Canada. There were over 1,200 responses to the survey. Most (92.6%) reported owning a mobile device and 41.8% reported owning both a smartphone and a tablet. The most commonly reported uses were finding drug information (73.4%), clinical calculations (57.9%), and taking notes (51.6%).

Respondents also used these devices to search for and read journal articles (46.5% and 50.2% respectively). Almost half (47.5%) used their mobile devices to access medical resources more than once a day. Wireless access in the hospital or clinic was reported to be the main barrier to using mobile devices for information seeking (70.7%). Authentication and installation problems were also technological barriers (39%). Knowing what resources were available was the second most reported barrier (55.8%).

Perspective:

The literature describing the use of mobile technologies by healthcare professionals is continuing to grow. This study adds to this with a large number of responses highlighting the central role that these devices continue to play in modern healthcare.

Developing mobile apps for stroke survivors and their caregivers

Summary of Abstract:

  1. This abstract presents the results of the first phase of research which include:
    Attitudes, experiences, and knowledge of stroke survivors and caregivers concerning mobile technology for health.
  2. Determines if there are differences based on gender, age, race, and ethnicity in attitudes, experiences, and knowledge of stroke survivors and caregivers concerning mobile technology for health

Purposive sampling was used to recruit English-speaking research participants from three racial/ethnic groups: Hispanic, Caucasian, and Afro-Caribbean and African American. Separate groups and interviews were conducted for stroke survivors and caregivers, and for those with previous experience using mobile apps and those with no app experience. Caregivers and stroke survivors alike pointed to a need for someone to show them how to download and use mobile apps; the experience needs to be more user friendly to get started. Caregivers and stroke survivors suggested that their doctor’s office​ would be the place where hands-on assistance in learning how to use a mobile app for personal health could be provided.

Perspective:

This abstract adds further weight to the literature suggesting that consideration of user interface and accessibility is key to acceptance and use of mobile devices. This abstract also highlights potential digital literacy inequalities which needs to be considered when implementing mHealth programs.

Preventive socio-technology for the increasing ageing population: apps as a way to improve the (social) wellbeing of elderly

Summary of Abstract:

A cross-national (Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden) ethnographic-based analysis was conducted. Through co-creation workshops as well as in-depth interviews, the scope of the study encompassed gaining insight into the needs and wishes of the elderly. A set of games (apps) on a tablet as a tool for increasing social wellbeing, targeting independent elderly people living at home were developed. They were based on these recommendations and tested in two countries. Impact studies were conducted (n=120) afterwards to test if the apps had the desired outcome with overall results being positive. 61% (n=107) felt more connected through the game while 65% had a positive feeling related to their self-esteem.

Perspective:

The study examines ethnographic findings for an application based on gamification principles transferable to the unique needs of the elderly population. This is an, as yet, underexplored area of research, particularly relevant given the aging population burden on many developing countries. This abstract shows the positive impact mobile tablet technologies can have on all generations of society.