By: Kathy Nieder, MD

This is part of the iMedialApps Patient centered app series — enabling physicians to get a better idea of apps they can consider prescribing to patients

In order for diabetic patients to keep their blood sugar levels under control, they need to do a good job of determining their insulin dosages and monitoring their medications regimes.

These medication regimens can be complicated and a smartphone app that helps determine insulin dosage, graphs glucose ranges, and helps to better understand carbohydrate content in various foods has potential to be extremely beneficial to patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

Track3 is a diabetes planner and carb counter by Coheso that logs and charts the following: glucose levels, exercise, medications, and weights.

It includes an insulin calculator and has an extensive food database with reference data on carbs.  The app enables patients to email a log of medications, glucose levels and activities — these are all transferable to a spreadsheet.

One can customize medications, foods and exercise as well as define nutritional goals.

Patients set medication and/or insulin types on the settings page and can define other parameters as well, such as nutritional goals and meal times. These settings determine how glucose, medications, and food are entered into the app.

This is the main data-entry page and includes an insulin calculator.

There are 80,000 foods, 500 food brands and 300 restaurants listed with nutritional data in addition to calorie and carb content. Carbs are easy to calculate with Track3, showing up in blue next to calories. More nutritional data are added regularly according to the web site, although it has not been updated (per the App store) since March 2011.

Pie chart and graphs can be photographed, with glucose levels pre-set by the user as very high, high, etc. as well as choosing what period of time (before breakfast, at night, etc).

Nutritional information is viewed on this page and can be compared to user-defined goals.

A log of weight, exercise, carbohydrates, medications, and nutritional information can be sent to a physician.

There is a log of the user’s weight, including a chart.

Healthcare Goals:

This app’s purpose is to improve a diabetic patient’s glucose control.  The app achieves these goals through the use of carbohydrate counting, insulin dose calculation, medication recording, exercise tracking, logging weight, and tracking user-defined nutritional parameters.

Evidence to Support Goals:

There are multiple studies that demonstrate improved glycemic control reduces complications in diabetics.  Studies also show self-monitoring of blood glucose leads to improved diabetic control — something this app aims to do.

Price:

  • $5.99
  • This app has a multitude of components for diabetic patients and is worth the price if used as intended, taking advantage of all its features.

Likes:

  • Two versions for glucose entry, one using mmol/L or mg/dl units.
  • Large nutritional database including many restaurants and brand names.
  • Quick entry with favorite foods.
  • Does not require internet connection to use but regularly updates the food database with app updates.
  • Includes an insulin calculator.

Dislikes:

  • Medications can only be measured in “units”, making it difficult to put PO medications.
  • No bar code scanning feature for simplified food entry.
  • Cannot sync across devices or with the Cloud.

Suggested Additional Features:

  • Logs for: HbA1c, cholesterol, BMI

Conclusion:

  • Contains all the essentials for diabetics: Carb counter, Insulin dosage recording and tracking, glucose tracking, medication recording. Ease of use, only two clicks to any main data entry.

Bottom Line:

  • Physicians should consider recommending this app to any diabetic patient who is counting carbohydrates — particularly Type 1 diabetics or Type 2 diabetics on insulin.

 iTunes Link 

Disclaimer:

This post does not establish, nor is it intended to establish, a patient physician relationship with anyone. It does not substitute for professional advice, and does not substitute for an in-person evaluation with your health care provider. It does not provide the definitive statement on the subject addressed. Before using these apps please consult with your physician or health care provider as to the apps validity and accuracy as this post is not intended to affirm the validity or accuracy of the apps in question.