News

Issues with Fitbit Force rash more widespread than initially believed

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It appears that an issue with the FitBit Force causing a rash might be more widespread than initially believed

Researchers develop flexible body sensors

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Researchers at North Carolina State University recently published a paper in Nanoscale on their use of silver nanowires to create stretchable, multifunctional sensors that can be used in biomedical, military and athletic applications

Games For Change partners with USAID to promote health games abroad

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Games For Change (G4C) seeks to promote the use of games in advancing social wellness, education, and health. G4C has partnered with USAID to develop 3 mobile health games implemented in India and Kenya.

Top 10 iPhone medical apps released in January

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This list goes through the best iPhone medical apps that were released this past month, in January.

The Alcohoot plugs into iPhone so you can measure your blood alcohol level

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The Alcohoot is a breathalyzer for smartphones. It helps those who drink monitor their blood alcohol levels using police-grade accuracy.

Blue Button apps aim to empower patients with their health info, interview with Humetrix EVP Chris Burrow

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Humetrix announced a new upgrade of their iBlueButton app to allow caregivers to manage records for themselves and family members, plus share Direct Address links — like an e-mail — to send patients updates to medical records.

iHealth showcases continuous monitoring wearable devices at CES 2014

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Recently at CES 2014, iHealth Lab, a subsidiary of Andon Health, presented three new continuous monitoring wearable health devices

Jawbone UP24 vs Fitbit Force, a physician’s recommendation for best activity tracker

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The Jawbone UP24 ($149) and Fitbit Force ($129) are quite similar–they both are worn around the wrist, both add sleep and nutrition tracking, both offer silent/vibrating alarms, both feature passive/continuous bluetooth syncing, both offer 7+ day battery life, and both offer excellent third-party integration. Regardless, spending time with the two devices reveals that each has a different personality and approach to the quantified self movement.

iMedicalApps publishes a How to Guide on mobile medical applications

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The editors at iMedicalApps have recently published a paper in the International Journal of Clinical Practice on “How to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in clinical practice” as an introductory guide for medical partitioners looking to incorporate their mobile devices into clinical practice

Apple’s focus on a “Healthbook” app could improve public health, force doctors to adopt mobile

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How Apple’s potential Healthbook app could be a game changer for physicians.

Current challenges in mHealth behavioral intervention research

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Here, we’ll explore how each of these ideas can help drive the development of a stronger evidence base for the use of mhealth tools to drive behavior change.

Leveraging mobile apps to keep up with massive amounts of medical literature

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New mobile apps offer a relatively new way of keeping up with the medical literature, however, new possibilities may arise to enhance the speed and access to key articles pertinent to clinical practice.