Orca Health and Harvard Medical School partner to create apps you can prescribe to your patients

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Orca Health, a Utah-based startup, has partnered with Harvard Medical School to create a series of apps and iBooks to help patients learn about their own conditions.

They have begun with a focus on the heart.

Currently, they have an app, Heart Decide, and four iBooks: Angina, Angioplasty, Atherosclerosis, and Cardiac Catheterization.

The idea behind the partnership is to create high quality, interactive ways to learn better.

The books have interactive animations as well as audio and video explanations to teach with a greater level of depth.

The app is based on text and 3D animations provided by Harvard Medical School.

In addition, Heart Decide provides a database of specialists that a patient can use to help find the doctor they need. As far as apps marketed to your patients go, you can trust that the information provided is accurate based on the partnership with Harvard Medical School. Of course and as always, you will need to discuss the information with your patient and help them to understand what it means for them.

The Heart Decide app is currently free. The iBooks are $4.99 each. In my opinion, these are great and inexpensive resources for medical students (like myself) to gain a much more solid understanding of the material that we are studying.

For your patients, Orca Health’s iBooks will demystify their conditions in a way that no level of explaining could.  Through videos, animations and explanations, your patient can begin to visualize what is going on in their hearts on their own time.

Orca Health’s products leave less to the imagination by showing concrete and interactive examples. While they may not have the level of detail that a physician would need, they provide an interactive aspect that pamphlets and textbooks cannot provide.

Source: Orca Health

Discussion ( 1 comment ) Post a Comment
  • I wonder how effective patient education can be that did not involve patients in the design. There is almost always a disconnect between what doctors want patients to know and what patients want to know.

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